Content Lessons and Links

historical_thinking_poster.jpg
Interactive Poster
Interactive link to the poster above - great to use with an Eno board and at the beginning of the year. Site also provides a video, quiz, and lesson ideas to go along with this poster, divided for elementary or secondary levels

Close Reading Powerpoint


General Resource Links


Project Based Rubrics
Free rubrics from Project Based Learning for the 21st Century

Junior General
Website with full battle simulation games to set up and play in the classroom. Provides directions, game boards, game pieces, and videos. Ancient world through modern US

http://www.icivics.org/icivics


For Your Info:

iCivics is a new, free, non-commercial collection of interactive games for students and lesson plans for teachers on American government and civic responsibility. Retired Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor founded the site to encourage students to become active and involved citizens. The games will appeal to students of all ages, but are targeted for students in grades 5-9 and are a good match with the grade 5 US History I and II standards on practices and principles of US government in the Massachusetts History and Social Science Curriculum Framework. Modules on argumentation are also relevant to the writing standards of the Massachusetts Curriculum Framework for English Language Arts and Literacy. iCivics is supported in the Commonwealth by a team led by Justice Robert J. Cordy of the MA Supreme Judicial Court.


Resources for History Teachers Wiki
Voted #2 for Best Wiki of the Year 2011 - History Resources and Lessons by Content Standard for grades K -12

Modern History Source Book
Produced by Fordham University, there are many content resources listed by topic on the left side. Good for all core curriculum courses.

ICT Magic

Voted #1 for Best Wiki of the Year 2011

Best of History Web Sites

Best of History Web Sites is an award-winning portal that contains annotated links to over 1200 history web sites as well as links to hundreds of quality K-12 history lesson plans, history teacher guides, history activities, history games, history quizzes, and more. BOHWS has been recommended by The Chronicle of Higher Education, The National Council for the Social Studies, The New York Public Library, the BBC, Princeton University, -- and many others.

Docs Teach.org
National Archives site with access to thousands of primary source documents, lesson plans, and activities.

Primary Source Analysis

Teachers Domain site with quick protocol for analyzing primary source documents.

Inquiry Resources
A list of lessons and strategies to incorporate inquiry based learning

Political Cartoon Analysis
A good website that includes a thorough lesson plan on analyzing a political cartoon. Be sure to click on the link in "Sensory qualities" it will connect you to the Elements of Cartooning handout including line, shape, texture, and color." It will help students to know exactly what they are looking for when they complete an I/See It/Means.

Jeopardy game maker

The History Channel site - all topics


ThinkFinity - Constitution
Many great lessons and activities on the Constitution, the Presidency, and women rights.
Take a look!


Frame, Focus, Follow-up -
http://www.teachersdomain.org/resource/vtlpd.pd.hints.frfofo/

Teaching Strategy: “Frame, Focus, Follow up”
There are at least three main reasons for integrating video segments into your lessons:
  1. To introduce a new topic
  2. To reinforce your current lessons through an additional experience
  3. To help assess the extent to which your students have mastered the material
  • Follow the link below, then click on “Teaching Tips” and read about “Effective Video-based Lessons” and how to use the video lesson strategy, "Frame, Focus, Follow-up" (some of which is reproduced at the bottom of this page)
http://www.teachersdomain.org/resource/vtlpd.pd.hints.frfofo/

  • Frame: Provide a context that helps students pay attention to the main content of the video. Ask students questions about the topic explored in the video to activate prior knowledge. When necessary, tell your students enough about the part of the story preceding the segment, so they can follow along.
  • Focus: Help students notice the important moments in the video by providing them with a specific focus, something to look for while they watch. Without a focus for viewing, students see all sorts of interesting details - but not necessarily the idea or information you want them to focus on.
  • Follow-up: Provide an opportunity for students to summarize what they saw - because they will see different things, and not always what you expected them to see! Re-telling what they saw helps students consolidate their understanding and remember it.

9/11 Video Resource
The Man in The Red Bandanna



US History


ARCH
The University of Maryland, Baltimore County has an excellent resource for history teachers. The UMBC Assessment Resource Center for Historyoffers sample assessments based on readings from six eras in U.S. history. The assessments include multiple choice question and performance tasks based on close reading exercises. The performance task assessments include scoring rubrics, sample responses from students, and the documents that students need in order to complete the performance tasks.

History Labs
From the Center for History Education at the University of Maryland. Inquiry based lessons solving historical problems.

Primary Source Sets
From the Library of Congress, 32 sets available so far.
Primary Source Sets typically include a mix of photographs, political cartoons, ephemera, maps, sound recordings, films, songs, and pages from historic American newspapers. Education experts at the Library have carefully selected these primary source gems to appeal to a wide range of grade levels and interests in the K-12 community.
Also comes complete with a four-section Teacher’s Guide:
  • Historical Background
  • Suggestions for Teachers
  • Additional Resources
  • Primary Sources with Citations

icivics
For Your Info:
iCivics is a new, free, non-commercial collection of interactive games for students and lesson plans for teachers on American government and civic responsibility. Retired Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor founded the site to encourage students to become active and involved citizens. The games will appeal to students of all ages, but are targeted for students in grades 5-9 and are a good match with the grade 5 US History I and II standards on practices and principles of US government in the Massachusetts History and Social Science Curriculum Framework. Modules on argumentation are also relevant to the writing standards of the Massachusetts Curriculum Framework for English Language Arts and Literacy. iCivics is supported in the Commonwealth by a team led by Justice Robert J. Cordy of the MA Supreme Judicial Court.

Animated Atlas

Stanford History Education Group Curriculum
Lessons by topic for USI and USII using primary sources, inquiry, and historical thinking skills.

National Archives Digital Vault
Students can create posters and movies using the National Archives collection

History Animated
Animated battles and great visuals from the Revolutionary War through World War II

Teaching History
Teachinghistory.org is designed to help K–12 history teachers access resources and materials to improve U.S. history education in the classroom. With funding from the U.S. Department of Education, the Center for History and New Media (CHNM) has created Teachinghistory.org with the goal of making history content, teaching strategies, resources, and research accessible.

American Experience - all the Presidents

Coming of the America Revolution
Great site from the Mass Historical Society

Bill of Rights Institute Lessons
Free lessons and resources on civics

Interactive Revolutionary War game
Mission US is a multimedia project featuring free interactive adventure games set in different eras of U.S. history. The first game, Mission 1: "For Crown or Colony?," puts the player in the shoes of Nat Wheeler, a 14-year-old printer's apprentice in 1770 Boston. Designed for middle school age students, this would still be appropriate for 9th grade students.

Top 50 American History Blogs
Useful for general interest in American History, categorized by topics

Rag Linen
Rag Linen is an educational archive of rare and historic newspapers, which serve as the first drafts of history and the critical primary source material for historians, authors and educators.

Teach History
A blog dedicated to educators of Colonial American history. They provide information about resources, products and multisensory teaching methods that can help inspire students.

Civil War - 150 years later
The Post commemorates the Civil War's 150th anniversary with commentary from experts, sesquicentennial news and an updating event calendar.

The Jim Crow Museum
The Jim Crow Museum of Racist Memorabilia: Using objects of intolerance to teach tolerance and promote social justice

American Revolution Interactive Battles

Paul Revere House Interactive lessons
Interactive tools on Paul Revere's midnight ride

Youth Leadership Initiative
YLI, a program of the University of Virginia Center for Politics, develops free education resources designed to assist civics teachers, and encourage students to participate in the political process. Great lesson plans on civics and the Constitution

Land and Freedom Lessons
USI and USII lesson plans. Each presents readings, activities, performance objectives and sources for further investigation.

Declaration of Independence website
From the National Archives, fun site with trivia and some interactive features, such as students being able to add their names to the Declaration

1 for All
Building awareness of the First Amendment. Lesson plans and free classroom resources



World History


Maps of War
Visual animated maps of war, politics, religion and government

National Geographic Atlas Puzzles
23 puzzles in all


Peace Corps Lessons
Insights on third-world countries – educators can access more than 50 interactive lessons


GapMinder

Uses software to analyze statistics in order to promote a fact-based world view.


Government and Law


Records of Rights
Interactive online exhibit from the Smithsonian and the National Archives that explores the ongoing struggle to define, attain, and protect rights.

icivics

For Your Info:
iCivics is a new, free, non-commercial collection of interactive games for students and lesson plans for teachers on American government and civic responsibility. Retired Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor founded the site to encourage students to become active and involved citizens. The games will appeal to students of all ages, but are targeted for students in grades 5-9 and are a good match with the grade 5 US History I and II standards on practices and principles of US government in the Massachusetts History and Social Science Curriculum Framework. Modules on argumentation are also relevant to the writing standards of the Massachusetts Curriculum Framework for English Language Arts and Literacy. iCivics is supported in the Commonwealth by a team led by Justice Robert J. Cordy of the MA Supreme Judicial Court.



"What is the Right Thing to Do?"



Harvard Professor Michael Sandel’s hugely popular course, “What is the Right Thing to Do?” is now available online.

Many thought provoking questions and cases for students to consider, very high interest.



Episode 1-The Moral Side of Murder

If you had to choose between (1) killing one person to save t

he lives of five others and (2) doing nothing, even though you knew that five people would die right before your eyes if you did nothing—what would you do? What would be the right thing to do? That’s the hypothetical scenario Professor Michael Sandel uses to launch his course on moral reasoning.



Episode 3 -The Libertarian Argument

This episode from Sandel's course examines the role of the government in lives of individual Americans. With humorous references to Bill Gates and Michael Jordan, Sandel introduces the libertarian notion that redistributive taxation—taxing the rich to give to the poor—is akin to forced labor.